News MASTER CLASS #1 WITH REBECCA AMSELLEM

« FOR A FEMINIST AND INCLUSIVE MUSEUM»

Among other partners, the Museum has invited Rebecca Amsellem, a French-Canadian economist and creator of the feminist newsletter Les Glorieuses to discuss with the Museum staff what a feminist and inclusive museum should look like.

At the Museum’s request, Ms Amsellem conducted extensive research and interviewed cultural leaders from around the world, drawing on the expertise of the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, the Brooklyn Museum in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in Sydney, La Fondation Cartier in Paris and UQAM in Montreal. She will share her findings in a series of master classes that will be open to the public, both at the Museum and online, and sponsored by Les Créatives festival and the International Film Festival and Forum on Human Rights (FIFDH), among others (full programme to be announced).

Ms Amsellem’s first master class will be held at the MICR and online on 23 September and will feature Susanna Pettersson, Director of the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, and Florence Schechter, Director of the Vagina Museum in London.

12:30-13:30 : Master class #1 « For a feminist and inclusive museum» (in English)

With the participation of Rebecca Amsellem (Gloria Media), Susanna Pettersson (National Museum of Sweden), Florence Schechter (Vagina Museum) and Pascal Hufschmid (MICR)

Registration to attend at the museum: pa.possa@redcrossmuseum.ch

Online broadcast on the museum’s social networks (Youtube, Facebook, LinkedIn)

18:30-19:30 : Table ronde « Concerné∙e∙s – Art, humanitaire & féminisme » (in French)

With the participation of Rebecca Amsellem (Gloria Media), Julie Enckell Julliard (HEAD-
Genève), Philippe Stoll (CICR), Pascal Hufschmid (MICR)

Registration to attend at the museum: pa.possa@redcrossmuseum.ch

Online broadcast on the museum’s social networks (Youtube, Facebook, LinkedIn)

For the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum, I imagined what a feminist museum would look like. Such an institution should acknowledge its role as a power-broker and aim to demasculinize its heritage and lend legitimacy to avant-garde social movements. To do so, it should commit to spotlighting neglected female and nonbinary creators and presenting diverse forms of masculinity. It should support advanced research in intersectional and feminist disciplines that have received little funding from universities. The public, rather than being considered passive visitors, should be co-creators and active agents in its exhibitions.” Rebecca Amsellem, economist and activist

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